Tuesday, September 25, 2012

McEuen Park Upgrades Ahead of Schedule

Beautiful early autumn weather and good soil conditions have combined to put crews ahead of schedule on the 2012 McEuen Park upgrade. Crews are currently excavating soil from the Third Street parking lot and hauling it to a site south of City Hall, where a new lot will provide parking for 179 vehicles and 23 boat/vehicle slots. “We’re slightly ahead of schedule,” Welch-Comer Engineers President Phillip Boyd said Tuesday afternoon. Soil taken from the “borrow site” at the Third Street lot is “sufficiently compactable,” expediting construction of the City Hall parking lot, Boyd said. Meantime, the City Hall parking lot off 8th Street is closed, but the utility drop box in that area is still accessible on the east side of 8th Street. While the good weather holds out, crews are working 10-hour shifts six days a week. Look for regular updates on the city’s web site.

Monday, September 24, 2012

North Idaho Reads, Banned Books Week Activities Scheduled

      Revolutionary times are on hand beginning this week at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library as events related to North Idaho Reads – with its focus on Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” – begin in earnest followed up by Banned Books Week activities. All activities are free and in the Community Room, 702 E. Front Ave., unless otherwise noted:
► Wednesday, Sept. 26, 10:15 a.m.: Pageturners Book Club Discussion of “F451” led by Communications Coordinator David Townsend. Pageturners discussions are open to any adult reader. The free book club is sponsored by the Friends of the Library.
► Thursday, Sept. 27, 7 p.m.: Scholar discussion of the book with Dr. David Adler. A professor of political science at Idaho State University for 25 years, Adler recently assumed the honor of the James A. McClure Chair in Political Science at the University of Idaho, and serves as director of the university’s James A. & Louise McClure Center for Public Policy Research.  
► Friday, Sept. 28, 7 p.m.: “Dystopian Film Festival: Fahrenheit 451.” Free screening of the 1966 science-fiction drama film directed by Fran├žois Truffaut and starring Oskar Werner, Julie Christie, and Cyril Cusack. Running time: 112 minutes. 
► Friday, Oct. 5, 7 p.m.: “Dystopian Film Festival: The Hunger Games.” A 2012 American science-fiction film directed by Gary Ross, based on the novel of the same name by Suzanne Collins. It stars Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Liam Hemsworth, Woody Harrelson, Elizabeth Banks, and Donald Sutherland. Running time: 142 minutes.
► Friday, Oct. 12, 7 p.m.: “Dystopian Film Festival: Gattaca.” A 1997 science fiction film written and directed by Andrew Niccol. It stars Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman and Jude Law with supporting roles played by Loren Dean, Ernest Borgnine, Gore Vidal and Alan Arkin.  Running time: 106 minutes.
    Following the theme, “Be the Revolution,” North Idaho Reads programs, films, books discussions, and even a costume party are planned for libraries and other venues. For the full schedule visit NorthIdahoReads.org.

     Banned Books Week – a celebration of our freedom to read – is Sept. 29 through Oct. 6. Three free activities are scheduled at the library along with educational exhibits:
► Monday, Oct. 1, 6:30-8 p.m.: “The Lorax,” a film based on the book by Dr. Seuss that has been challenged in some communities because of its environmental theme. The movie will be shown in the Shirley Parker Reading Room of the Seagraves Children’s Library on the lower level.
► Thursday, Oct. 4, 7 p.m.: Banned Books Week Read Out, representatives from the Library Board of Trustees, Library Foundation, City of Coeur d’Alene, Coeur d’Alene Police Department, and others will read from challenged books and discuss why the books were challenged. City Councilman Mike Kennedy will emcee. Refreshments provided by the Friends of the Library.
► Friday, Oct. 5, 4-5:30 p.m.: “The Lorax,” in the Children’s Library.

    (Children under 6 visiting the library need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.)

 
Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network, cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.

Library to Host Civil War Reading Series

In commemoration of the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War (1861-1865), the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, in partnership with the Idaho Humanities Council, is offering a five-meeting, scholar-led reading/discussion program exploring the theme “Making Sense of the American Civil War,” in November and December.
The program is free but only 25 copies of each of the three books to be used in the series are available. Participants are asked to commit to attending all sessions in the series. Participants will also need a current Cooperative Information Network library card.
The five two-hour book discussions are scheduled for five Thursday evenings, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., on the following dates: Nov. 8, 15, 29, Dec. 13, and 20 in the library Community Room at 702 E. Front Ave.
To sign up for the series contact David Townsend, Library Communication Coordinator, at 208-769-2315 Ext. 426 or by e-mail at dtownsend@cdalibrary.org.   
 “Making Sense of the Civil War,” is a program developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Library Association to give a glimpse of the vast sweep and profound breadth of Americans’ war among and against themselves.  The series is organized as a series of “conversations” that are meant to be considered together.
“Each conversation is itself arranged as an unfolding story, moving forward in time,” said Rick Ardinger, Executive Director of the Idaho Humanities Council. “Some of the readings were written by eye-witnesses, some written for perhaps only one other person to read, while others were well researched after the passage of time and imagined for vast audiences. And 150 years after the defining war in our nation’s history, Americans are still discovering its meanings.”
The discussion series is based on the readings of three books:
¢  “March,” by Geraldine Brooks, is a Pulitzer Prize-winning historical novel which tells its story through the voices of characters from another novel, “Little Women,” by Louisa May Alcott.
¢  “America’s War,” edited by historian Edward L. Ayers, is mostly a collection of writings by people who had to decide for themselves before and during the war where justice, honor, duty, and loyalty lay, including selections written by Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Henry David Thoreau, and many others.
¢  “Crossroads of Freedom: Antietam,” by historian James McPherson, explores the battle in the fall of 1862 that changed the course of the Civil War.
Scholars who will lecture and facilitate discussions so far include University of Idaho History Professor and Dean of Letters Arts and Social Sciences Dr. Katherine Aiken, North Idaho College History Professor James Jewell, and Boise State University Andrus Center for Public Policy Director Dr. David Adler.
Books will be distributed beginning Oct. 8.
For more information about the series, contact Townsend at 208-769-2315 Ext. 426.
     
Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network, cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.

‘Star Wars Reads Day’ at Library Oct. 6

       The Coeur d’Alene Public Library will celebrate reading and all things Star Wars with “Star Wars Reads Day,” Saturday, Oct. 6, 1-3 p.m.
The day will include games, crafts, displays, refreshments, and a free screening of the film “Star Wars: The Clone Wars” on the big screen in the library Community Room, 702 E. Front Ave.
The computer-generated movie was produced in 2008 as an introduction to the television series of the same name.  Directed by Dave Filoni, the movie is narrated by Tom Kane and also features the voice talents of Matt Lanter, James Arnold, Taylor Ashley, Eckstein Dee, Bradley Baker, Christopher Lee, Samuel L. Jackson, and Anthony Daniels. It’s rated PG and has a running time of 98 minutes.
The “Star Wars” franchise began in 1977 with release of the movie “Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope,” and has since spawned numerous multi-media products including a series of popular sci-fi books and graphic novels.
Children under 6 visiting the library need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14 even during programs. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network,  cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.






Turn in Old Medications at CdA Library, September 29th

The Coeur d’Alene Police Department is sponsoring a “Prescription Drug Turn-in Day” as part of the Drug Enforcement Agency’s fifth National Pharmaceutical Drug Take Back Day, September 29th. The Prescription Drug Turn-In will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. in front of the Coeur d’Alene Library, 702 E. Front Avenue. Coeur d’Alene Police will be on hand during that period to receive and destroy outdated or unused prescription medication.


The purpose of “Prescription Drug Turn-in Day” is to stop the diversion of medications at the “source” and to help citizens dispose of outdated medications or medications that are no longer needed. By disposing of the items safely, it also helps our environment because they won’t be flushed into the wastewater system. “There is growing concern that personal care products and pharmaceuticals can pass through a wastewater treatment plant and end up poisoning aquatic life in our rivers and streams,” said Wastewater Superintendent Sid Fredrickson. “We ask our citizens not to flush these products down the drain.”

PLEASE NOTE: Only medications will be accepted – do not bring syringes or biohazards. Please do not bring, for example, allergy needles or needles used for injections.

Sharpies will be provided for the public to mark out any personal information on the prescription bottle. Chief Longo encourages the public to turn in unused prescription medications. For more information, please call 769-2320.

Thursday, September 20, 2012

McEuen Construction Zone

McEuen Park is under construction and access to the park is prohibited. The park is a construction zone and for everyone’s safety citizens will need to walk around the orange construction fence in the park using Front Avenue and 8th Street for the perimeter route.

Access to Tubbs Hill is still open at the Third Street entrance. Please stay on the walkway along the seawall to reach the Third Street access point to the hill. Tenth Street, at E. Lakeshore Drive, is the other access point on the east side of the hill. If you have any questions, contact the Parks Department at 769-2252.

Tuesday, September 18, 2012

Library Book Club Joins ‘Let’s Talk About It’

The Pageturners Book Club at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library will participate in the “Let’s Talk About It” program beginning in October with books provided by the Idaho Commission for Libraries.
The Pageturners meeting the fourth Wednesday of each month – except December – at 10:15 a.m. in the library Community Room, 702 E. Front Ave. The free book club discussions are open to any adult reader. The group was begun two years ago and has been supported by a grant from the Friends of the Library.
The book club was previously scheduled to read Anthony Doerr’s “The Shell Collector,” in connection with the Idaho Humanities Lecture and Dinner in Coeur d’Alene on Oct. 12 where Doerr is the speaker.  However, due to a scheduling conflict the Pageturners’ presenter will not be available on Oct. 24 for the book club discussion. (“The Shell Collector” will still be available for those who wish to read it prior to the Humanities event.)
The Pageturners “Let’s Talk About It” series is from the “Global Perspectives” theme. Discussion leaders for the series are provided through the Idaho Humanities Council Speakers Bureau.
The book club will read “Balzac & the Little Chinese Seamstress” by Dai Sijie as its October selection and will discuss the book on Oct. 24. The discussion will be led by scholar Ron McFarland.
Discussion dates, titles, and scholars for the coming months will be:
► Nov.  28: “Disgrace,” a novel by J.M. Coetzee, scholar Gary Williams.
► Jan. 23: “Eva Luna,” fiction by Isabelle Allende, scholar Paula Coomer.
► Feb. 27: “The Road From Coorain,” a memoir by Jill Ker Conway, scholar Barbara Meldrum.
► March 27: “The Space Between Us,” fiction by Thrifty Umrigar, scholar Georgia Tiffany.
Visit the Research and Information Desk to check on the availability of the book for each month.
In addition to the Idaho Commission for Libraries and the Idaho Humanities Council “Let’s Talk About It” is made possible through the support of the National Endowment for the Arts and a generous gift from U.S. Bank. 

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network, cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Saturday and Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.
 
 

Monday, September 17, 2012

No Building/Mechanical/Plumbing Inspections on Tuesday, October 2nd

The City of Coeur d’Alene Building Services Department would like to inform contractors and homeowners that there will be no building, mechanical, or plumbing inspections performed in the City of Coeur d’Alene jurisdiction on Tuesday, October 2, 2012 due to required staff training for continuing education credits on the 2009 International Residential Code.  Please call 769-2267 for more information.

Monday, September 10, 2012

Bradbury Classic is 2012 “North Idaho Reads” Selection


By David Townsend
Library Communications Coordinator
 
North Idaho’s libraries are urging area residents to read “Fahrenheit 451” by the late Ray Bradbury and to join the conversation during a series of film screenings and programs for North Idaho Reads (NIR) kicking off the week of Sept. 23.

Bradbury, one of the most celebrated science fiction writers of our time, died this year on June 5 at age 91. In “F451” he describes a world where information technology has evolved to the point where books and the written word are no longer valued and are, in fact, burned along with the building that contains them.

North Idaho Reads activities include an overview discussion of the book by Idaho Humanities Council speaker David Adler. The NIR Film Festival will include screenings of the 1966 film “Fahrenheit 451.” Other films examining dystopian future worlds will be shown in the following weeks at several North Idaho libraries. See a full schedule at NorthIdahoReads.org.

The discussion will continue during Banned Books Week, Sept. 30 through Oct. 6 and during Teen Read Week, Oct. 14-20. Futurist David Brin, author of the recently released novel, “Existence,” will do a virtual presentation via an Internet link at several libraries on Oct. 25.

Activities will wrap up with a ticketed concert and dance at the Jacklin Arts and Culture Center in Post Falls on Oct. 27. The “Banned Music” Concert and costume party will feature the music of “The Hitmen.”

At least two, area book clubs will be discussing “F451.” The Pageturners Book Club, meeting at the Coeur d’Alene library, will discuss it on Sept. 26, with the discussion led by David Townsend. Virginia Johnson will lead a discussion with the 3Cs Book Club on Oct. 17.
Participating libraries include the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, The Community Library Network, the East Bonner County Library District, and the West Bonner Library District.

Funding for NIR is provided by the Idaho Humanities Council as part of the “We the People Initiative” of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Additional funding has been provided by Friends of the Library groups at each of the participating libraries. Community partners for the program include the Coeur d’Alene Press and the Jacklin Arts and Culture Center.  More information about NIR can be found at the group’s Facebook page, facebook.com/NorthIdahoReads.

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Groundbreaking September 10th for McEuen Project Launch

A groundbreaking ceremony is scheduled for Monday, September 10th, at 10:00 a.m., at the lower level of the Coeur d’Alene City Hall to launch the McEuen Park Project.  The project involves the parking lot on the south side of City Hall, a connector trail from east to west across the park, removal of part of the larger 4th Street parking lot, mass grading, and utility installation.  This work is scheduled for completion in November 2012. Full McEuen Project completion is scheduled for November 2013.

Mayor Sandi Bloem, City Council representatives, Team McEuen participants, and many others are anticipated to gather with community members to celebrate this important event.

For more information, please contact Doug Eastwood at 769-2252.

Tuesday, September 4, 2012

Creating “Safe Zones” for Trees


We are familiar with keeping our families and our children safe – but keeping our trees safe?  And what exactly is a “safe zone”? A safe zone is an area around a tree trunk where grass and weeds don’t grow to prevent damage to trees from the use of lawn equipment close to the tree trunk.

The idea is, if you aren’t mowing or weed-whacking close to tree trunks, you are less likely to come into contact with them. Weed whackers with their nylon whips can cut through the bark and into the vascular layers, essential to tree health and growth.  The damage often extends all the way around the tree.

Cuts in the trunk that go beyond the bark will first disrupt the downward flow of sugars from the leaves, leaving the roots without needed resources for health and growth. Then, if wounded just a little further, the flow of water and minerals from the roots to the leaves is interrupted.  Damage to these systems will also affect tree support, storage ability, and defense against the spread of disease and decay.

Provide a safe zone for all of your trees and prevent one second of “oops” from wiping out a sizeable investment of money and time.  “Better to be safe than sorry” is definitely true for trees and lawn maintenance equipment.

Community Canopy recommends that a grass and weed-free safe zone be established at least 18 inches out from the trunks of trees.  You could create an outer, 36-inch diameter barrier, such as plastic edging or cement curbing, in this instance.

If there is already turf around a tree trunk, establish the safe zone by removing the grass and roots by hand.  A composted mulch layer will help reduce the germination and growth of weeds.  Mulch has many added benefits, such as maintaining soil moisture and improving soil fertility.  Mulch should be at least 2, but no more than 4 inches deep, tapering to zero as it approaches the tree trunk. Periodic maintenance will be needed.

The safe zone message with graphic above is available in the Parks Department at City Hall, and is being distributed to local homeowners’ associations and landscapers. More information can be found at www.communitycanopy.org.