Monday, November 30, 2009

Home Holiday Safety

By Sergeant Christie Wood
Public Information Officer
Coeur d’Alene Police Department

During the holiday season, the Coeur d’Alene Police Department experiences an increase in theft and burglary reports. Christmas gifts, beautifully wrapped and placed under a well-lit tree, or left in cars, garages, and storage sheds, are desirable to thieves.

Be extra cautious about locking doors and windows when you leave the house, even if you will only be gone for a minute. Don't put large displays of holiday gifts in view of your windows or doors. After the holiday be careful not to advertise what you got for Christmas by putting the boxes out on trash day. Break the boxes down and put them out the morning of trash pickup day.

In order to protect your property from theft year round, we’d like to offer some helpful tips for home security:

Burglars can enter your home in any number of ways. Most of them simply enter through the front door, but first-floor windows, back doors, storage areas, and second floor windows are also likely points of entry.

Most homeowners don't think of the second story of their house as being vulnerable but it is. Are there trees or branches burglars could climb to get into the second story of your house? Are there drain pipes or trellises that can be climbed? How about access to a second story deck?

Large bushes provide hiding places and cover for burglars and thieves. Your landscaping shouldn't provide help or cover for burglars. Trim the branches back or even have trees cut down. You can also move the downspouts to an area where they don't compromise security. Although a trellis may be pretty, if it's in the wrong place it really should be moved or taken down.

If your garage is connected to your house, make sure to keep the inside door locked. If your garage door opens with a remote control, check for updated technology. The remote may open and shut your garage door, but if it is an older style with a single frequency, you are vulnerable to anyone having the same kind of remote. Consider getting a remote system with rolling code changes to help ensure that no one else can open your garage door.

Walk around the house after dark and see where some outdoor lighting could make your home more secure. Criminals don't like light and the better lighting you have on possible entry points, the safer and more secure your family will be. You can now buy solar powered lights that will help protect your home at a small cost. Put them where you need them.

Another option is motion sensing lighting that will go on automatically if someone is prowling around. Examine your doors and entries to determine if your locks need to be replaced. Consider installing steel doors with a good, deadbolt locking system. All entrances need to have good doors and locks that will keep you and your family safe and secure. Security cameras and alarm systems provide an extra layer of protection that prove to be a good crime deterrent. The more you do to make getting into your house difficult, the better chance you have of staying safe and secure in your home.

If you are a victim of a crime, report it to the Police Department immediately at 769-2320. Be careful to preserve any evidence left at the scene of the crime and do not enter your home without a police escort if you believe someone has burglarized your home while you were away. The Coeur d’Alene Police Department would like to wish all of our residents and visitors a joyful, safe, holiday season and hope you enjoy all the upcoming holiday events our community has to offer.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

Peer Award ~ David Townsend

Responding to the public and co-workers with thoughtfulness and intelligence are just two of David’s many great characteristics. His work developing programs for the library are awe-inspiring given the many other tasks he accomplishes.

A master at finding funding sources, David is always on the lookout for grants to pay for library programming. Some examples are the current quilt and fabric art display and many others including the Smithsonian exhibit on fences, numerous speakers funded by the Idaho Humanities Program and collaborative work with other libraries.

Because David is a professional journalist, his writing skills reflect wonderfully on the library and the city as a whole. His press releases and work on displays, pamphlets, posters, and handouts is always excellent. Our library is envied because we have such an extraordinary communications coordinator.

Pictured is David Townsend (left) receiving his award from PEER Award Committee member Terry Leigh (right).

Congratulations!

Monday, November 23, 2009

Vaccinations for Secondary Students Start Dec. 2

The Panhandle Health District will provide H1N1 vaccinations for secondary school students with parental consent throughout the five northern counties starting on Dec. 2.
Students will bring home consent forms for a parent’s signature. Students need a signed consent form to get the vaccination. Consent forms are available on the PHD website — http://www.phd1.idaho.gov/ — in case students lose the forms given to them in school.
The vaccine will be provided for students only in the schools. Other family members can make appointments for public vaccination clinics scheduled later in December.
PHD finished vaccinating elementary school students in the five northern counties last week. More than 11,000 doses of the H1N1 vaccine were given to children in public and private schools.
Vaccination of secondary students will continue through Dec. 11. Students older than 10 years old need only one dose of the vaccine.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported on Nov. 12 that H1N1 had infected 8 million children in the United States younger than 18 years. Of those children, 36,000 have needed hospitalization and 540 have died. Vaccinating children is a high priority and will provide protection against further illness in this vulnerable population.
For updated information on PHD’s H1N1 vaccination clinics, visit www.phd1.idaho.gov.

This article has been posted in cooperation with the Panhandle Health District and the North Idaho Public Information Network.

Keep Kids Reading for the Holidays

Make reading part of your holiday tradition with December Reading Programs at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave.
“Holly Jolly Holidays” programs begin Dec. 1 and continue through Dec. 18 in the Seagraves Children’s Library. Each free session includes stories, poems, activities and crafts customized for each age group. Sessions include:
► Book Babies Lap-Sit: For ages birth to 2 years accompanied by a parent or other adult caregiver, Tuesdays, 10:15-10:45 a.m., and Fridays, 10:30-11 a.m.
► Tales for Twos & Threes: 2-3 year olds, Tuesdays, 11-11:30 a.m.
► Preschool Storytime: 3-5 year olds, Wednesdays, 10:30-11 a.m., and 1-1:30 p.m.
► LEGO Club: 5-10 year olds, Thursdays, 4-5 p.m. LEGOs provided for a session of creative building.
► Lonely Books Club: 9-12 year olds. Visit the library for a list of overlooked great books. Meets Wednesday, 4-5 p.m.
Watch the newspaper and library website for news about a special holiday event at the library on Dec. 19. Winter Programs will begin at the library on Jan. 12, 2010.
Children under 6 visiting the library need to be supervised by an adult or a person who is at least 14. Children ages 6-9 should be accompanied by someone who is at least 14 who will remain in the building.
Patrons who need accommodations are asked to contact the library staff prior to attending programs.
More information about December Reading programs is available by contacting Youth Services at (208) 769-2315 Ext. 438. More news and information about the Coeur d’Alene Public Library is available online at www.cdalibrary.org.

Peer Award ~ Steve Wolf

Anyone that deals with Steve is pleasantly surprised by the depth of his vast knowledge, prompt response and quality of completed projects.

Steve is vested in every project he is involved in. His involvement with “police car rigging” brought the program to a level of sophistication that makes the Street Department shop shine. His motives are never to achieve personal glory but to achieve the department mission and team effort.

Steve is dependable in his ability to complete projects without delay and the ability to provide more than expected.

Congratulations!

Award-Winning Snow Removal Program is Ready to Roll

By Tim Martin
Street Superintendent

For our newcomers who have heard all of the horror stories about how cold and snowy it can be in Coeur d’Alene, relax. In a typical winter, there are six or seven good snowstorms that each takes a couple of days to fully “mop up.” That’s about 14 snow days to weather. Our first real snowstorm will likely occur sometime later this month or early December. It will be named Storm “American Falls.” This year’s storm names – alphabetically themed after names of Idaho cities – were created by Ryan Swallow, first place winner from Mrs. Duncan’s fourth grade class at Winton Elementary (2005-06). Why do we name storms? In order to track, record, and critique our performance, we give each storm a name. It also helps us communicate storm status on KVNI radio, the press, and on the city’s web page. Plus it’s fun and it gives kids something to think about.

We’ve already been planning and preparing for winter. Over 240 lane miles of streets receive on average 67 inches of snowfall each year. With additional resources that the City Council has dedicated to street maintenance and some process improvements, the average time for us to complete a citywide plowing has been reduced to about 38 hours, a 25 percent decrease from the 1999-2000 winter. One statistic we keep is the number of missed school days; there have been only ten since the winter of 1999-2000, six of which occurred in the last two record years (sorry kids).

In 2004, the Association of Idaho Cities recognized Coeur d’Alene with a City Achievement Award for its unique and popular “Snow Gate Program.” Where practical, neighborhood plowing is done with front-end loaders equipped with “snow gate” plows. These state-of-the-art snow machines enable us to reduce the amount of snow you may find in your driveway after we pass by. Also, the 2009-2010 Snow Plan recommends a target of 36 hours for a citywide snow plowing, reduced noticeably from the 52-hour target of a few years ago. The 36-hour target compares well and in most cases exceeds targets of other comparable snow cities in the northwest.

I wish you could ride in our snowplow trucks, graders, or loaders to appreciate just how demanding and potentially dangerous it is to plow snow. We are blessed to have a very talented group of equipment operators working for the city. As a team, they have dramatically reduced the number of snow plowing complaints, and our operators, both men and women, have maintained a remarkable safety record.

Would you help us to do a better job? After a major snowstorm, please try not to park on the street until after we finish plowing. You will get a much better result. If you are in doubt as to whether we are plowing, listen to KVNI 1080 AM or call us at 769-2233. The Street Department website will also be updated regularly. I would encourage you check this valuable tool.

Although snow removal is improving in the city, it is not realistic to expect all snow problems to go away. I promise you that we will do the best job possible.

Sunday, November 22, 2009

Library Closing Early Wednesday, Closed for Thanksgiving

The library will close early -- at 6 p.m. -- on Wednesday, Nov. 25, and will be closed Thursday, Nov. 26, for Thanksgiving.

The library will be open for its regular hours, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., on Friday, Nov. 27.

The library's online resources, including the catalog and databases, are available 24 hours a day. Most databases require a user name and password. These can be obtained by visiting the library at 702 E. Front Ave., or by calling 208/769-2315, during open hours.

More library news and information is available online at www.cdalibrary.org.

Friday, November 20, 2009

Ribbon Cutting Celebrated


Mayor Sandi Bloem, City Council members, city staff, St. Vincent de Paul Board and staff, and officials from Contractors Northwest participated in a ribbon cutting ceremony for a 15-unit apartment house completed at the corner of Fruitland and Neider built with $2 million in grant funding from the Department of Housing and Urban Development's Section 811 program. Named “The Lynn Peterson House” in honor of past St. Vincent de Paul Executive Director Lynn Peterson, the facility is sited be on land that is leased for 75 years from the City of Coeur d' Alene. The prime contractor for the construction was Contractors Northwest of Coeur d' Alene who started construction in April of this year. St. Vincent de Paul Society of North Idaho will manage the facility. Related to the construction project was the city’s extension of Neider Avenue west to Howard as well as improvements to Howard.

The purpose of the HUD Section 811 program is to expand the supply of supportive housing for very low-income persons with disabilities. This project will consist of 14, one-bedroom units and one, two-bedroom manager unit. Units will be approximately 550 square-feet each. The intent of the program is to provide independent living and supportive services available through community resources. This will be permanent housing that will remain affordable as the project will be federally subsidized for 40 years. Open spaces, sidewalks, landscaping, and parking lots will be maintained through the federal subsidy.

Photo: (left to right) Mayor Sandi Bloem, Lynn Peterson, Councilman John Bruning

Thursday, November 19, 2009

What's Happening at the Library?

An update of activities at the Coeur d'Alene Public Library produced for CDA-TV by Jeff Crowe. Cable Channel 19 provides live and recorded coverage of public meetings and other items of interest to the citizens of Coeur d'Alene. More library news and information is available online at www.cdalibrary.org.
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CORRECTION

The name of the suspect is Jason Anthony Wahl, not Anthony Jason Wahl. Wahl, 29 years of age, is from Lewiston Idaho.

SUSPECT NAMED IN ROBBERY

The suspect in the Shopko Pharmacy is identified as Anthony Jason Wahl, 29 years of age, from Lewiston Idaho. He will have a first appearance today. No further information on the robbery is available at this time.

REPORT OF ROBBERY

On November 18th 2009 at 8:57 pm Coeur d’Alene Police responded to the report of a robbery in progress at the Shopko Pharmacy located at 217 W. Ironwood Drive. The store was open for business with employees and customers inside.

Officers were advised an armed male suspect was inside the front door of the business and was being physically restrained by a Shopko employee. Sgt. Walther and Sgt. McCormick were in the vicinity of the store and were able to respond immediately. They both observed the Shopko employee on the floor, on top of the suspect, and struggling to get physical control of the handgun. Both sergeants restrained the suspect while he was actively resisting and gained control of the weapon. The suspect, a 29 year old male from Lewiston Idaho, was taken into custody and placed into a patrol car.

Witnesses stated the male walked into the store wearing a ski mask. He approached an employee in the pharmacy, claimed he had a gun and ordered the employee to give him prescription medication. He grabbed the medication and attempted to flee the store when a Shopko employee tackled him near the door.

While in custody the male suspect appeared to have a seizure. Medical personnel examined him and found him to have no injuries. He was transported to Kootenai Medical Center and was later transported to the jail.

This incident remains under investigation. Anyone with information on this crime is asked to contact Coeur d’Alene Police at 769-2320.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

PEER Award ~ Amy Ferguson

A "PEER" (Peer Employee Excellence Recognition) award was presented to Amy Ferguson. Amy’s involvement in the City’s Art Commission has been invaluable. She is so organized it has helped bring needed structure to the Commission. Amy handles the majority of the commissions’ correspondence, sends out all agendas and prepares the minutes.

Amy did all the design and research with putting together the Arts Commission flyer saving the commission hundreds of dollars. She also compiles the maintenance requirements on art pieces as well as gathering information on artists.

Amy has the most positive attitude I have ever encountered and is always happy. The Arts Commission has come along way in the last few years and part of the success is due to Amy.

Pictured presenting the award on behalf of the PEER Award Committee is Melissa Tosi (l) to Amy Ferguson (r).

Congratulations Amy!

City Hall Closed for Thanksgiving Holiday

On November 26th and 27th, Coeur d’Alene City Hall will be closed for the Thanksgiving Holiday. Other city offices and facilities will be closed as well. Emergency calls for Police, Fire, and Streets, can be made by dialing 9-1-1. Other city facilities have emergency numbers and can be reached if the need arises: Sewer Back-up 769-2241 and Water 755-9729.

City Hall and other city facilities will open Monday, November 30th, at 8:00 a.m. For more information, please call 769-2204.

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

What's Happening at the Library?

Here's an update of activities at the Coeur d'Alene Public Library produced by Jeff Crowe for CDA-TV. Cable Channel 19 provides live and recorded covereage of public meetings and other information of interest to the citizens of Coeur d'Alene. More newas and information about the library is available online at www.cdalibrary.org.
video

Monday, November 16, 2009

Books for Christmas to feature McManus, Reynolds

Best-selling author Patrick McManus and western cartoonist and author Boots Reynolds will be on hand for the second annual Books for Christmas event at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave, Thursday, Nov. 19, 5-7:30 p.m.
Offered by the Coeur d’Alene Chapter of the Idaho Writers League and the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, the event showcases area authors as they introduce their books and gather for an evening of presentations, book signings, prizes and refreshments.
McManus will sign a variety of his books, including his newest, “The Double-Jack Murders.” Reynolds, whose artwork can be found across the United States on Leanin’ Tree Greeting Cards, will sign copies of his recently published book, “Boots ‘n’ Beans.”
The event also includes multi-award-winning romance novelist Nikki Arana. Other authors include historical fiction and historical nonfiction writers Larry Telles, Elizabeth Brinton and George Brinkman; Alaska-adventure writers Mike Kincaid and Nancy Owens Barnes; Novelists Michael Marsden, Maryn Langer and Charles Lyons; writer/musician Gary Edwards; and nonfiction author Dr. Mark Cochran.
Treat your friends and family with autographed copies of books by area authors at reasonable prices. Not only can you get your holiday shopping done early this year by giving the gift of a “Good Read,” but you will support the Coeur d’Alene Friends of the Library, who receive a portion of the proceeds..
For more information contact Valerie Luce at 509/922-1539 or Nancy Barnes at 208/448-0833.
More news and information about the Coeur d’Alene Public Library is available online at http://www.cdalibrary.org/.

SCADA Keeps Water Flowing Smartly, Smoothly

SCADA, an acronym for “Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition” is the computer and communication program that runs the city’s water system of well pumps, booster pumps, storage reservoirs, and pressure zones. Signals from level controls at the water tanks tell the well pumps that they are getting low and that it’s time to start filling the tanks. Booster stations get signals from pressure switches, tank level sensors, and high demand periods, which tell them to start pumping more.

The SCADA program also sends data back to the main computer for monitoring, adjustments, collection of data, and acknowledgement of alarms. The SCADA program can also be accessed remotely by authorized Water Department personnel at their home during off hours from their laptops via the internet. SCADA is equipped with an auto-dialer that will call Water Department personnel in the event of an alarm, during or after normal work hours.

Historically, water systems were managed by direct inspection. Most systems, including the city’s, had an operator housed near the storage tanks to make sure that they were operating smoothly. Daily visual inspections were the rule and not the exception. The Water Department's first automatic control system was a telemetry unit. It did roughly the same thing as the current SCADA program does, only mechanically, instead of electronically through a computer system. It did an adequate job of monitoring the system, but a poor job of collecting data. Computer-based SCADA allows the Water Department to collect specific data and to be able to monitor its complex system from remote locations.

“We’re pleased with the efficiencies and data produced by the SCADA program,” said Councilman Woody McEvers, liaison to the Water Department. “It allows us to effectively monitor the system and to provide the best service to our customers.”

The SCADA program is also used by the city’s Wastewater Utility. For more information, please contact Water Superintendent Jim Markley at 769-2210.

Monday, November 9, 2009

H1N1 Vaccination Clinic for Target Groups

The Panhandle Health District (PHD) will take appointments Saturday, Nov. 14, for H1N1 clinics on Saturday, Nov. 21, for people in the vaccination target groups in each of the five northern counties.
The toll-free appointment line—877-415-5225--will be open from 9 a.m. until 1 p.m. on Nov. 14. The target groups are:
  • Pregnant women;
  • People who live with and/or care for children younger than 6 months old;
  • Anyone from age 6 months through 24 years;
  • Healthcare and emergency response workers; and
  • People from age 25 through 64 with chronic health conditions.
The clinic on Nov. 21 will allow children younger than 10 who had their first dose of vaccine on Oct. 24 to get their second dose and meet the necessary separation time between doses. Clinics on Nov. 21 will be held:
  • 10 a.m. to noon in Boundary, Bonner, Benewah and Shoshone counties;
  • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Kootenai County
PHD also is shipping nearly 4,000 doses of vaccine this week to doctors throughout the five northern counties for patients who fit into the vaccination target groups. Doctors receiving the vaccine include pediatricians, OB/GYNs, family practice physicians, allergists and more.
For updates on the vaccination clinics and H1N1 in northern Idaho, visit www.phd1.idaho.gov or call PHD’s toll-free H1N1 hotline at 866-528-3501

This article has been posted in cooperation with the Panhandle Health District and the North Idaho Public Information Network.

Keep Streets Clear for Emergency Vehicles

The Coeur d’Alene Police Department would like to remind residents to move their boats, trailers, and inoperable vehicles off of city streets. It’s especially important during this time of the year when the annual city leaf pick up is just starting, and as we’re about to move into our snow removal season.

In addition, the Police Department receives numerous complaints of abandoned vehicles. Per city ordinance, vehicles parked on city streets must be moved after 24 hours. The Coeur d’Alene Police Volunteer Unit keeps records of abandoned vehicle complaints and follows up by tagging and towing vehicles left illegally on the roadway.

In winters past, abandoned vehicles have prevented or delayed emergency responders – fire, EMS, and police – from getting to their destination. In some cases, especially fire and EMS calls, minutes can mean the difference between life and death; between smoke damage and a total loss fire.

Vehicles that have been left unattended and are buried in the snow are considered abandoned and a hazard. These vehicles will be towed under the authority of the Police Department. Once a vehicle is determined to be on the roadway illegally, it is marked with an orange tag. An attempt is then made to contact the registered owner. After 48 hours, if the vehicle has not been moved, it is put on the tow list and is towed as soon as possible. If the vehicle is determined to be an immediate hazard, it will be towed prior to the 48-hour timeframe and an owner may not get prior notification.

The tow fee payable to Shaffer’s Towing ranges from $85.00 to $145.00, depending on the equipment used. The storage cost is approximately $30.00 per day. Vehicles valued under $200.00 are turned over to Shaffer for immediate sale after 15 days. Vehicles valued over $200.00 go to auction by the city after 30 days.

Chief Longo asks for cooperation from each citizen. “Winter conditions will soon be upon us,” he explained. “It takes a considerable amount of our resources to address vehicles that have become a hazard or have been abandoned. I encourage vehicle owners to take responsibility for their vehicles and get them removed. This will help ensure that emergency vehicles are able to respond to the needs of our citizens.”

To report an abandoned vehicle, please call 769-2320 and leave a message on the voicemail designated for abandoned vehicles.

LEAF PICK UP COMMENCED

Leaf pickup has commenced this morning. Crews are currently working South of Sherman. When they finish up in that area (early afternoon), then they will move into the Ft. Grounds area. As anticipated the rains will help keep the leaves tight and the cleanup will be much easier.

For additional information: 769-2233.

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Library Closed Wednesday for Veterans Day

The library will be closed Wednesday, Nov. 11, in observance of Veterans Day.
Patrons with Internet access can still access databases linked to the library website - http://www.cdalibrary.org/ - 24 hours a day. Call 208/769-2315 or visit the library at 702 E. Front Ave. during open hours to obtain the passwords for the databases.
Normal library hours resume Thursday, Nov. 12, at 10 a.m.

Friday, November 6, 2009

Congratulations to POST Academy North Graduates

A graduation ceremony was held today at NIC’s Boswell Hall for the second “POST North” Academy graduating class - POST Class 809. POST Stands for Peace Officers Safety and Training (POST) Academy, and completion of POST is essential for a police officer to become certified. It used to be that North Idaho police agencies had to send their police candidate trainees to Meridian, Idaho for training. A North Idaho academy enables the training needs of local police agencies to be met locally, reducing training costs. This is a great example of partnering by NIC, the POST Academy, and local law enforcement agencies.

Congratulations to new CDA PD officers / POST Class 809 graduates: Jordon Noble, Nate Petersen, Jim Doster, and Bryan Alexander. Special congratulations to Class President Nate Petersen for receiving honors as class Top Gun and Outstanding Professional. Special congratulations also go to Officer Bryan Alexander for honored as Outstanding Academics and for distinguishing himself as Top Overall Student.

Well done graduates!

Pictured (left to right) Councilman John Bruning, Chief Wayne Longo, Nate Petersen, Bryan Alexander, Jordon Noble, Jim Doster, and Lieutenant Bill McLeod.

CdA Charter Academy Chooses Cemetery for Annual Project

The CDA Charter Academy has adopted the city's cemetery for its annual school project, raking pine needles and leaves off the grounds every fall. In addition to their students coming to the cemetery, Parks Department staff members take them on the "Historical Walking Tour" and show them all the points of interest that the cemetery proudly boasts. This is the third season that the academy has volunteered for this work.

Video Update: What's Happening at the Library?

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Here's an update of activities at the Coeur d'Alene Public Library produced by Jeff Crowe for CDA-TV. Cable Channel 19 provides live and recorded coverage of public meetings and other information of interest to the citizens of Coeur d'Alene. More news and information about the library is available online at www.cdalibrary.org.

Health District Vaccination Clinic for all Target Groups

The Panhandle Health District (PHD) will provide H1N1 vaccinations to people in all vaccination target groups by appointment in clinics in each of the five northern counties on Saturday, Nov. 7.
The target groups are:

Pregnant women;
People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months old;
Anyone between the ages of 6 months through 24 years;
People from age 25 through 64 with chronic health conditions such as asthma or diabetes;
Healthcare and emergency response workers.

“We want to make sure that the people the CDC has identified as needing it most get it as soon as we have it,” said Jeanne Bock, PHD director. “We’ve had many calls from people in the target groups who are worried and want the vaccine. Now that we have it, we want them to have it.”
For the 1,200 doses of vaccine available in the nasal flu mist and the injectable form, PHD will take appointments Friday, Nov. 6, from 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., on its toll-free appointment line, 1-877-415-5225. The vaccination clinics will be open:

10 a.m. to noon in Boundary, Benewah and Shoshone counties;
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Bonner County;
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Kootenai County.

For updated information on H1N1 vaccination clinics in the five northern counties, visit www.phd1.idaho.gov or call PHD’s toll-free H1N1 hotline—1-866-528-3501.

This article has been posted in cooperation with the Panhandle Health District and the North Idaho Public Information Network.

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Specialized Needs Recreation Presents 5th Annual Prom Night, Saturday, November 7th

On Saturday, November 7th, Specialized Needs Recreation (SNR) will hold its 5th Annual Prom Night at Prairie View Elementary in Post Falls (2478 East Poleline) from 6:00 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. This year’s theme is “Romance and Roses.” Come and join the party! There will be a DJ playing your favorite hits, some great snacks, and lots of fun!

Ladies, if you need help with your hair, nails, or make-up, there will be volunteers at Prairie View Elementary to help you get all dolled up. This is a free service before the prom begins, from 4:30 p.m. until 5:30 p.m., but you must sign up for this in advance. If you are interested, please call Angie at 755-6781.

There will be a $10.00 entry fee per person. Pictures will be taken by Maximum Exposure Photography starting at 5:30 p.m. If you choose to get your pictures taken with your date or friends the cost will be an additional $10.00.

If you need a tuxedo, “Touchdown Tuxedos” in Post Falls is offering a great deal to SNR participants who are attending the Prom. Just say you are going to the SNR Prom and get your tux for only $49.95. This cost includes everything including shoes – whatever style you choose. Touchdown Tuxedos also has brand new ladies dresses for only $30.00.

If you have any questions about the prom, want to volunteer for SNR, or would like more information, please call Angie Goucher at 755-6781 or visit the website at www.snr.bz.

Specialized Needs Recreation is a non-profit organization that provides recreational opportunities for youth and adults who have disabilities.

City Hall Closed Veterans Day

On Wednesday, November 11, 2009, Coeur d’Alene City Hall will be closed for Veterans Day. Other city offices and facilities will be closed as well. Emergency calls for Police, Fire, and Streets can be made by dialing 9-1-1. Other city facilities have emergency numbers and can be reached if the need arises: Sewer Back-up 769-2241, and Water 755-9729.

City Hall and other city facilities will open Thursday, November 12th, at 8:00 a.m. For more information, please call 769-2204.

Pipes Just Need a Little TLC

Pay Attention to Pipes Now, or Pay Later

It’s one of those autumn days you remember from childhood – bright blue skies, leaves that run a full spectrum of harvest colors, a faint smell of wood smoke in the air, and someone is making apple pie, just a few doors down. When you were a kid, you could take in all these sensory delights, go home and do a little school work, and usually, not have to worry about much else.

These days, the calendar shows a “20” instead of “19” in front of each year. Now, when the weather turns colder and there is frost on your windshield, it’s probably time to start thinking about winterizing your home, putting on snow tires, and paying some attention to your water pipes.

Frozen pipes can be a real nightmare. During a cold snap, temperatures can drop to as low as -20°F in the Coeur d’Alene area. When this happens, pipes can freeze and later break, causing thousands of dollars of damage to your home.

If you haven’t paid attention to your pipes yet, it’s not too late. Your water pipes need to be kept warm – at least above freezing. They need a little care. But before you rush to wrap your indoor pipes, take advantage of the relatively warmer afternoon temperatures and do a little winterizing outdoors. A few simple preventative measures can make all the difference – inside and out:

•Make sure you have disconnected all outside garden hoses. If the water in the faucet freezes, you will likely have a leak after it thaws out. Hose bib covers can be purchased to insulate outdoor plumbing fixtures. And remember to drain the water out of your garden hoses, too!

•Check your foundation or crawl space vents – if they aren’t covered, they should be, and they should be insulated.

•Along with foundation vents, be sure to check for any other holes in your foundation that might cause wind to blow into your crawl space. Small holes might be left from an old cable line or an abandoned home improvement project. A frosty draft quickly primes a pipe to freeze.

•Exposed pipes freeze first. If you have a crawl space, make sure these pipes are covered with appropriate insulating material and possibly heat tape.

•On very cold nights, you might want to open the doors on the kitchen cabinets that typically conceal plumbing. Most kitchen plumbing is installed near an exterior wall. Opening cabinet doors allows warmer, room-temperature air to circulate. Do the same for bathroom plumbing located in cabinets located near an exterior wall.

•Be prepared – know where your water shut-off is located.

Water pipes usually aren’t high maintenance household items until they freeze and burst. To avoid this, give them all the care and warmth they need. Show them some attention now so that they’ll be there for you when winter gives you the cold shoulder.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009

History Series Program Looks at Fur Hunters

A continuing history series co-sponsored by the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave., will look at the lives of early day fur hunters.
Mark Weadick, a fur trade historian dressed as a free hunter will present the program “Fur Trade Free Hunters; Their Lives and Legacies” on Friday, Nov. 13, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room.
The program will include a screening of “The Coin of the Realm,” a film about the fur trade at Spokane House.
This free program is sponsored by Sponsored by the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, Molstead Library at NIC and The Museum of North Idaho. It is funded by the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
More news and information about the Coeur d’Alene Public Library is available online at http://www.cdalibrary.org/.

Health District will Vaccinate Young Children

The Panhandle Health District (PHD) will provide H1N1 vaccinations to preschool children starting at 6 months of age by appointment in clinics in each of the five northern counties on Saturday, Nov. 7.
From supplies that just arrived, PHD also provided vaccine for emergency response workers and has delivered vaccine to pediatricians, obstetricians, gynecologists and family practice doctors. All the vaccine is designated for people who fit into the vaccination target groups set by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
“We want to make sure that the people the CDC has identified as needing it most get it as soon as we have it,” said Jeanne Bock, PHD director. “We’re able to get the vaccine to children from age five up in most of the schools, and we’re hoping to reach most of the younger children through child care centers.”
For the 1,200 doses of vaccine available in the nasal flu mist and the injectable form, PHD will take appointments Thursday, 5:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., on its toll-free appointment line, 1-877-415-5225. The vaccination clinics will be open:

10 a.m. to noon in Boundary, Benewah and Shoshone counties;
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Bonner County;
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Kootenai County.

Callers will be given the clinic locations when they make their appointments. As more vaccine arrives, PHD will schedule more clinics. The next public vaccination clinic for people in any of the target groups will be Dec. 12 in each of the five northern counties. The target groups are:

Pregnant women;
People who live with or care for children younger than 6 months old;
Anyone between the ages of 6 months through 24 years;
People from age 25 through 64 with chronic health conditions such as asthma or diabetes;
Healthcare and emergency response workers.
For updated information on H1N1 vaccination clinics in the five northern counties, visit www.phd1.idaho.gov or call PHD’s toll-free H1N1 hotline—1-866-528-3501.

This news article has been posted in cooperation with the Panhandle Health District and the North Idaho Public Information Netowrk.

HOLIDAYS & HEROES


How It Works:

Every year police officers and firemen from Coeur d’Alene and Spokane take children shopping for a day. Children’s names are provided to the organizers by School Resource Of f i c e r s , s c h o o l counselors, patrol o f f i c e r s , d e p u t y sheriffs, or firemen who have come into contact with a needy child during this last year.

The event begins on Sunday, December 13th with children being picked up at their home by a police officer in a patrol car. Officers and firemen then mobilize in tandem and take the children to the Spokane Valley Wal-Mart and the Post Falls Wal-Mart.

Police and firemen take the children through the store picking out Christmas gifts for them and their families. Last year there were approximately 100 police and firemen shopping with the kids. After the shopping is complete, the children are taken back to the Coeur d’Alene Greyhound Park to visit with Santa. The facility is graciously provided free of charge for this event.

While the children are meeting Santa, volunteers wrap their presents and prepare a large food basket for their family.

At the end of the day the officers load the presents and food into their patrol cars and take the children home. All of the officers and firefighters participating are volunteering their time on their day off. There will still be a regular shift of officers and firefighters covering the normal patrol duties in Kootenai County and Spokane

Holidays and Heroes has been a joyful experience for the kids involved. We hope it is even bigger and better this year with the continued support of our communities. All of the agencies participating would like to wish everyone a safe and happy holiday season.

How to Donate:

Holidays and Heroes is accepting cash donations and food items that can be dropped off at:

- Coeur d’Alene Police Department at 3818 Schreiber Way

- Post Falls Police Department at 1717 E. Polston Avenue

- Kootenai County Sheriffs Department at 5500 N. Government Way

- Spokane County Main at 1100 W. Mallon

- Valley Office at 12710 E. Sprague

As more donations are provided, more needy children can be put on shopping lists for this event. Police and fire departments will be participating in upcoming food drive events in and Coeur d’Alene and Spokane. Citizens are asked to make a food or cash donation at these events.

If you would like to help our agencies with this year’s event, please contact the Coeur d’Alene Police Department, Community Relations Division at 769-2363.

HOLIDAYS AND HEROES Is courtesy of:
_ COEUR D’ALENE POLICE DEPARTMENT
_ POST FALLS POLICE DEPARTMENT
_ KOOTENAI COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT
_ KOOTENAI FIRE DEPARTMENT
_ COEUR D’ALENE TRIBAL POLICE
_ SPOKANE COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT
_ IDAHO STATE POLICE

Monday, November 2, 2009

Fiber & Fabric Exhibits Installed

Volunteers Roger Harris, left, and Ron Litz hang one of 40 quilts, mini quilts and wall hangings currently on display at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library as part of “Fiber & Fabric: Art Born of Necessity.

Program at Library
Includes Speaker, Activity Day

The work of numerous creative North Idaho residents is currently on display at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave., as part of “Fiber & Fabric: Art Born of Necessity. The exhibit will continue at the library through November.
Exhibit items were organized and installed in cooperation with North Idaho Quilters Guild, CDA Yarn and Fiber, Harmony Yarn and other community volunteers.
Thursday, Nov. 12, at 7 p.m., the library will host a free program in the Community Room with Rudolph Kovacs, professor and chairman of the Art and Pre-Architecture Department at Idaho State University. Among other classes, Kovacs teaches beginning, intermediate and advanced weaving classes at ISU and has been involved in national exhibits of his work.
Saturday, Nov. 14, 1-3 p.m., the library will host “Beginners Day” with several individuals and groups involved in the fiber and fabric arts represented for the benefit of people interested in learning how to get started with these skills. Groups involved in such activities spinning, knitting, and quilting are also invited to share information about their organizations.
Refreshments and activities for children will also be available.
Anyone interested in participating as a presenter at “Beginners Day” is asked to contact Townsend at (208) 769-2315 Ext. 426 or by e-mail at dtownsend@cdalibrary.org.
“Fiber & Fabric: Art Born of Necessity” is supported in part by a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council, a state-based program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, as part of the NEH We the People Initiative.
More news and information about the Coeur d’Alene Public Library is available online at http://www.cdalibrary.org/.

Regional Non-Motorized Transportation Plan Public Comment Period

The final draft of the Regional Non-Motorized Transportation Plan, developed by the Kootenai Metropolitan Planning Organization (KMPO), is complete and available for review and public comment.

The goal of the plan is to create a non-motorized transportation system to increase walking and bicycling for transportation, as well as address the needs of area pedestrians and bicyclists.

The plan can be viewed at http://www.kmpo.net/Non-motorized%20plan/NMP_Report09_draft.pdf (This is a 4MB file, so it may take some time to open) or by calling 1-800-698-1927 for a hardcopy. The comment period starts 11/2/09 and all comments must be received by/on 12/1/09 by emailing to kmpo@kmpo.net, mailing to KMPO at 221 W First Ave., Suite 310, Spokane, WA, or calling 1-800-698-1927.

For special accommodations or translation services, call 1-800-698-1927. KMPO assures nondiscrimination in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and Civil Rights Restoration Act of 1987 (P.O. 100.259) and the Americans with Disabilities Act.