Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Coeur d'Alene welcomes new planning director



The city of Coeur d’Alene is pleased to announce the selection of Hilary Anderson as its new community planning director. Anderson, currently the planning and economic development manager for the city of Post Falls, will assume her new position on November 24.

For the past three years Hilary has performed professional and advanced planning work involving the administration, advanced research and analysis, and presentation of information and recommendations of long-range planning and economic development issues in Post Falls.

“We are thrilled to welcome Hilary to our staff. Her experience and knowledge of local planning issues, as well as her proven leadership, will be a great asset to our talented and devoted planning staff,” said Coeur d’Alene Mayor Steve Widmyer.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Bat Program to Roost at Library Nov. 3

WREN Biologist Jenny Taylor to Share ‘Wonders of the Night’
They are the only mammal capable of sustained flight, feared by many, and misunderstood by most – bats.
Biologist Jenny Taylor will share some insights into this fascinating creature with her program “Bats – Wonders of the Night,” Monday, Nov. 3, at 7 p.m. in the Community Room at the Coeur d’Alene Public Library.
Taylor represents WREN, an all-volunteer public education and wildlife conservation group. Her program will include information on why bats are important in our lives, bat myths, and which bats have habitats in North Idaho.
More information about WREN is available at www.wren2.org.


Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network, cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday & Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Drone buzzes around standpipe to inspect exterior



At 160 feet tall, the Prairie Standpipe in northern Coeur d’Alene is said to be the largest structure of its kind in the world. Yes, world. That’s impressive, but it also makes determining the condition of its exterior a challenge.

Until now. In this day of drones, getting a bird’s eye view is much easier, much to the delight of the city’s water department.

Built in 1993, the 2 million gallon Prairie Standpipe is due for a new coating of exterior protection, said water superintendent Jim Markley. “It’s starting to get to the point where rust is developing,” he said.

A consultant for the city this week unleashed a drone to determine the condition of the conspicuous structure, more commonly known as a water standpipe.

By surveying and documenting the condition up close, the consultant can put together more accurate and detailed specifications for contractors who may be interested in applying the coating.

“The more the contractor knows what’s going to be encountered the more accurate the bids are going to be,” Markley said. That minimizes the possibility of change orders that could add to the cost and time to the work.

Markley said the drone did an exceptional job. “It took 15 minutes to zip around and get pictures and that was it,” he said.

The standpipe project will go to bid early next year. The work is expected to be performed in April.

Veteran Coeur d’Alene cop Pat Sullivan retires


Officer Pat Sullivan, forefront, at his retirement party on Thursday.

After more than 27 years on the job, Coeur d’Alene police officer Pat Sullivan is unpinning his badge. During a retirement party on Thursday attended by dozens of law enforcement officials representing multiple agencies, Sullivan was praised for his professionalism and dedication to his career.

“Officer Sullivan was an informal leader in the department who will be greatly missed,” said Chief Lee White.

Though he officially retired on Thursday, Sullivan will continue to serve the department as a volunteer with firearms training and in other areas of law enforcement he specialized in over the years.

White provided a long list of accomplishments for Sullivan, including: Field training officer, Community Accident Reduction (CARE) unit, Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) officer, range master at firearms, top officer for annual drunk driving arrests at least five years, and drug recognition expert.

“He has so many certifications, it’s difficult to mention them all,” White said. “It’s a huge loss to the department.” A search is currently under way for Sullivan’s replacement.

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Granite tablets arrive at McEuen Park Donor Wall


Kevin Peterson (left) and Jeff Anders of Wilbert Precast install the granite tablets at McEuen Park.

Six black granite tablets were installed at McEuen Park on Thursday with the first of six tablets already engraved with names from donors. For a $500 donation, you can have your name, family name, business or loved ones name engraved on the donor wall. “It’s a great idea for a Christmas gift,” said Debbie Wilson, Executive Director of the Panhandle Parks Foundation. Each tablet has room for 64 lines, each with a maximum of 24 letters.

Now that all six granite tablets are installed, a mobile engraver will add names in groups of 20 to 25 as lines are purchased, Wilson said. Donations received will be used for maintenance and amenities for Coeur d’Alene Parks and help to secure property for future parks, open space and recreational facilities in the Lake City.

To purchase space on the donor wall, email Wilson at debbie@panhandleparksfoundation.com. A donor form can also be downloaded from panhandleparksfoundation.org or interested parties can call Wilson at 446-4813. A box with donor forms will also be placed at the donor wall soon.

Meantime, the Panhandle Parks Foundation is planning an unveiling at the donor wall. A date and time will be announced soon.


Seasonal Activities at Library for All Ages

The feel outside is autumn and inside the Coeur d’Alene Public Library is offering seasonal activities for all ages.
The Seagraves Children’s Library on the lower level at 702 E. Front Ave. will celebrate Lights On After School and the Worldwide Day of Play Thursday, Oct. 23, at 5:30 p.m. This free Fall Festival will include carnival games, a book walk, crafts, and refreshments. Fall Reading Programs in the children’s library continue through Nov. 21.
Young adults, ages 12-18, are invited to enjoy a Halloween film and to create Day of the Dead Calavera Masks beginning at 4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 30, in the Gozzer Room. Participants are encouraged to wear their Halloween costumes. Snacks will be provided.
Also Oct. 30, beginning at 7:30 p.m., the North Idaho College Film Club will screen “The Shining” in the Community Room. Free popcorn is provided and a discussion will follow the film. This 1980 movie directed and produced by Stanley Kubrick was based on the book of the same title by Stephen King. Starring Jack Nicholson and Shelley Duvall, this film is rated “R.”
For information on these and all library programs visit the library’s online calendar at www.cdalibrary.org by clicking the EVENTS link.

Patrons who need accommodation to participate in library programs or services are asked to contact the staff prior to the activity by calling 208-769-2315. For more library information visit cdalibrary.org. The library is a department of the City of Coeur d’Alene and a member of the Cooperative Information Network, cinlibraries.org. Library Director, Bette Ammon. Library hours: Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m./Friday & Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m./Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. For regular updates follow the library on Facebook and Twitter.



Kootenai Health donates $7,500 for Coeur d’Alene street trees




Crews from Senske Tree and Law Services plant a tree donated by Kootenai Health in the public right-of-way.
Thirty trees were recently planted in public right-of-way in Coeur d’Alene thanks to a $7,500 donation to the city’s reforestation program from Kootenai Health.

Because of the expansion of the hospital, some trees within the footprint of the new building on their property had to be removed. Kootenai Health will be planting many replacement trees on their property. Additionally, the hospital wanted to sponsor a planting program to help offset the loss of the trees on their property.

The 30 trees selected for planting are large deciduous shade trees and are being planted where there is adequate growing space and no overhead power lines. Abutting property owners have agreed to provide care, including watering and protecting from mowers and trimmers.

“These new street trees will provide many environmental, social and economic benefits for the entire community for years to come,” said Coeur d’Alene urban forester Katie Kosanke. “A big thank you to Kootenai Health for the generous donation!”